The Weekly Herald: Race In A Broken World

This week: Juneteenth is tomorrow, but there is still work to be done on both sides of the aisle. This email is about the different "types" of racism, what we can (and should) be doing as the Church, and more.

INDIVIDUAL VS. SYSTEMIC RACISM

In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Justin Holcomb welcome Phillip Holmes to offer his perspective on some of the differences between individual and systemic (or systematic) racism.

Holmes connects these elements to biblical categories such as total depravity, and unpacks several examples from his own life.

Watch more here at The Gospel Coalition >>>

 


 

SO... WHAT EXACTLY IS JUNETEENTH

The Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, had established that all enslaved people in Confederate states in rebellion against the Union “shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.”

But in reality, the Emancipation Proclamation didn’t instantly free any enslaved people. The proclamation only applied to places under Confederate control and not to slave-holding border states or rebel areas already under Union control.

This is the history of Juneteenth >>>

 


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👕  MEME OF THE WEEK

Through Him all things are possible.
Yes... even you... reading this right now.

Click here for more >>>

 


 

RACE IN A BROKEN WORLD

Danté Upshaw led a workshop with the Bay Area Chapter of The Gospel Coalition titled “Race in the New Community.”

Speaking of the new community created by God through Christ, and sharing from his own experiences and Scripture, Upshaw opened a conversation around the necessity of handling race in a gospel-centered manner.

Rooted in Ephesians 3, Upshaw encouraged a grace-filled approach to dealing with our divided history and experiencing the mystery of the gospel together.

Listen to the full podcast episode here >>>

 


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

"Truly He taught us to love one another.
His law is love and His gospel is peace.
Chains he shall break, for the slave is our brother
And in his name all oppression shall cease."

Placide Cappeau, O Holy Night